<disp-quote>

Quote, Displayed

Extract or extended quoted passage from another work, usually made typographically distinct from surrounding text.

Attributes

content-type Type of Content
id Identifier
originator Originator
specific-use Specific Use
xml:lang Language

Model Description

The following, in order:

This element may be contained in:

<ack>, <app>, <app-group>, <bio>, <body>, <boxed-text>, <disp-quote>, <fig>, <glossary>, <license-p>, <named-content>, <non-normative-example>, <non-normative-note>, <notes>, <p>, <ref-list>, <sec>, <styled-content>, <supplementary-material>, <table-wrap>, <term-display>, <term-sec>

Example 1

...
<sec>
<title>Introduction</title>
<disp-quote>
<p>Dead flies cause the ointment of the apothecary to send forth a
stinking savor; so doth a little folly him that is in reputation
for wisdom and honour.</p>
<attrib>Ecclesiastes 10:1</attrib>
</disp-quote>
<p>The term &ldquo;flies in the ointment&rdquo; is occasionally used
to describe minor defects in some endeavor.  But this quote from
Ecclesiastes has a much wider scope ...</p>
</sec>
...

Example 2

Epigraph:

...
<body>
<disp-quote>
<preformat>... who would fardels bear,
To grunt and sweat under a weary life,
But that the dread of something after death,
The undiscover&rsquo;d country from whose bourn
No traveller returns, puzzles the will
And makes us rather bear those ills we have
Than fly to others that we know not of?</preformat>
<attrib>William Shakespeare, Hamlet, Act III,
Scene IV</attrib>
</disp-quote>
<p>Shakespeare well understood the underpinning of
our society&rsquo;s tenacious need to cling to life:
the fear of death, the fear of the unknown.  Yes, we
acknowledge death is part of nature&rsquo;s cycle,
but even as we do so, we struggle ...</p>
<sec>...</sec>
</body>
...

Module

JATS-para0.ent