ISO Management Systems, November-December 2004
Risk management

ISO Management Systems, November-December 2004November-December

Risk management
From right decisions to successful outcomes

Corporate governance is the glue that holds an organization together in pursuit of its objectives while risk management provides the resilience. The challenge is for the organization to identify clearly the risks it must manage and to assign ownership and accountability for their effective management.

ISO Management Systems, July-August 2004
Oil and gas sector

ISO Management Systems, July-August 2004July-August

Taking the first steps...

...in environmental management
It explains clearly how an SME can implement an environmental management system so that the process is not a series of hurdles, but rather a set of practical steps towards raising environmental and business performance.
...in quality management
Having taken the decision to implement a quality management system, small and medium-sized enterprises in particular are often unsure just how to get started. This feature takes SME managers through the first steps.

ISO Management Systems, May-June 2004
Phoenix Police and ISO 9000

ISO Management Systems, May-June 2004May-June

6 Sigma and ISO 9001:2000 – rivals or partners?

Quality was once the prerogative of engineers in white coats, employing specialized tools and techniques for measurement and analysis. With the arrival of the ISO 9000, quality was no longer a specialist function, but moved to the boardroom as a central management concern. Does 6 Sigma and its tools and techniques represent the revenge of the quality technicians, or does it add to the “what needs doing” of the ISO 9000 approach the necessary “how to do it”?

ISO Management Systems, January-February 2004
Act-Plan-Do-Check

ISO Management Systems, January-February 2004January-February

Towards a generic model for integrating management systems

Organizations worldwide are looking to integrate their management systems to enhance efficiency and effectiveness. This article presents a generic model for doing so and applies it to the integration of ISO 14001:1996 (environment), ISO 9001:2000 (quality) and the non-ISO standard OHSAS 18001:1999 (occupational health and safety).